research spotlight

Transportation Innovation Collection Now Available on Mendeley

Research Collection

In the spirit of shared learning, Way2Go has curated a collection of research articles around transportation initiatives, for you, our community partners. Our goal is to better inform explorations of initiatives and innovations related to transportation by offering the latest research in one, easy to access, centralized location. See below for some examples of what you can find there.

The collection is housed on Mendeley, a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize and share research, as well as collaborate with others online. Way2Go’s publicly available list of curated research documents can be found at https://www.mendeley.com/community/transportation-innovation-collection/documents.

You will need to create a free Mendely account to view the list of documents. If you would like access to the full documents, email Theodora at Way2Go (tgw43@cornell.edu), and your account will be added to the Way2Go group, which will enable full access to the pdfs as well as the ability to add to the collection.

Recent Additions to the Collection:

“We want to go, but there are no options”: Exploring barriers and facilitators of transportation among diverse older adults (2021)

Dabelko-Schoeny, H., Maleku, A., Cao, Q., White, K., & Ozbilen, B. (2021). “We want to go, but there are no options”: Exploring barriers and facilitators of transportation among diverse older adults. Journal of Transport & Health, 20, 100994.

Highlights

  • Transportation barriers are associated with an elevated risk of social isolation and decreased quality of life among older adults.
  • The number of older adult immigrants and refugees living in the U.S. is growing.
  • This is the first study of its kind to include transportation experiences of diverse older immigrants and refugees in the U.S.
  • Immigrant and refugee older adults identified neighbors, language, and information as influencing their mobility.

Considerations for the transportation of school-aged children amid the Coronavirus pandemic

Abulhassan, Y., & Davis, G. A. (2021). Considerations for the transportation of school-aged children amid the Coronavirus pandemic. Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, 9, 100290.

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential concerns and countermeasures (immediate and long term) to be considered for the safe transportation of children amid the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis by taking into consideration the design of school bus cabins and the anthropometric characteristics of children. COVID-19 mitigation strategies concerning cabin design and busing operations are discussed to provide general recommendations for operating fleets while providing as safe and healthy a passenger environment as possible considering both practicality and cost-effectiveness. The risk of virus transmission among school bus passengers may be reduced by adhering to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, and additional bus specific considerations such as structured loading and unloading criteria, face coverings guidelines, incorporation of a bus monitor, and potential modifications/design changes for existing/future school buses. Several controls being used to protect passengers from virus transmission in other modes of mass transportation could also have the potential for immediate incorporation into school buses.

Urban design and public transportation–public spaces, visual proximity, and Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) (2020)

Stojanovski, T. (2020). Urban design and public transportation–public spaces, visual proximity, and Transit-Oriented Development (TOD). Journal of Urban Design, 25(1), 134-154.

Walking distances conventionally define service areas for public transportation and urban growth boundaries for Transit-Oriented Development (TOD). Urban designers accordingly draw rings around transit stops and arrange transit-supportive land uses within 10-minute walksheds. This approach to TOD neglects processes of creating public spaces in visual proximity of transit stops. This paper proposes a methodology to analyze public spaces and looks at how commercialization and public space patterns unfold through viewsheds around transit stops. The results reveal amoebic TOD patterns of public spaces that are much smaller than conventional walking radii. This alternative viewshed approach can be helpful in designing TODs.

Last updated April 16, 2021